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Notre Dame researchers using new technologies to combat invasive species

  A new research paper by a team of researchers from the University of Notre Dame’sEnvironmental Change Initiative (ND-ECI) demonstrates how two cutting-edge technologies can provide a sensitive and real-time solution to screening real-world water samples for invasive species before they get into our country or before they cause significant damage....

New Notre Dame research paper offers insights on 'ecological speciation'

A new paper by researchers at the University of Notre Dame provides new insights into speciation, which is the evolutionary process by which new biological species arise. The research team, which was headed by Scott P. Egan, a research assistant professor with the Advanced Diagnostics and Therapeutics Initiative, and included...

Ten Notre Dame faculty members named AAAS fellows

Ten University of Notre Dame faculty members have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in honor of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished. AAAS, founded in 1848 as a nonprofit association, is the world’s largest scientific...

Notre Dame receives grant to fight invasive species

Notre Dame is getting involved in the fight to protect the Great Lakes. The university has received a $599,931 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to develop technology for early detection of invasive species in the Great Lakes. "By stopping these species we can stop the ecological costs, but also...

Feds back research to stop Great Lakes invasions

JOHN FLESHER, AP Environmental Writer Updated 3:06 p.m., Tuesday, October 2, 2012 Read the online version.   TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Federal grants will support stepped-up research into ways to prevent invasions of the Great Lakes by foreign animal and plant species, with special emphasis on refining techniques that detect...

What baboons can teach us about social status

A new study by University of Notre Dame biologist Beth Archie and colleagues from Princeton and Duke Universities finds that high-ranking male baboons recover more quickly from injuries and are less likely to become ill than other males.

Notre Dame biologists tackling big questions in evolution

University of Notre Dame researchers Scott Egan, Jeff Feder and Jason McLachlan, have teamed up with researchers from the University of Iowa and Cornell University on a collaborative grant from the National Science Foudnation. With the $1.1 million grant, the team hopes to answer one fundamental question: As a new...

Jones receives Lindeman Award

Stuart E. Jones, assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences who focuses on aquatic microbial and ecosystem ecology, has received the Raymond L. Lindeman Award from the leading professional organization Advancing the Science of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO). The award, started in 1987, honors an outstanding paper written by...

Notre Dame biologist Pfrender plays key role in Daphnia sequencing

University of Notre Dame biologist Michael Pfrender is the coauthor of a paper appearing today in the prestigious journal Science describing the sequencing of the species Daphnia pulex, often referred to as the water flea. Daphnia, a small freshwater crustacean, is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. It...