EAGER: The implications of interacting land use legacies and drought cycles for lake district carbon cycling

  • Funded By: National Science Foundation
  • ECI Investigators: Stuart Jones

EAGER: The implications of interacting land use legacies and drought cycles for lake district carbon cycling

This project is developing regional models to better predict how lakes will affect our future climate through the processes of carbon sequestration (burial in lake sediments) and greenhouse gas emission. This project combines long-term data collected from lakes throughout Wisconsin with a new modeling framework to predict the amount of carbon and other nutrients stored or emitted from lakes and how drought cycles and the surrounding land use interact to affect these elemental fluxes.

Researchers at Notre Dame use model-data assimilation to address two questions: how do decadal drought cycles modify lake biogeochemistry, and how does agricultural intensification and its legacies alter lake responses to drought?

The research contributes new insights into lake contributions to regional elemental cycling and will more generally explore how temporal variability and legacies interact to alter ecosystem processes. Results will improve predictions of existing climate models by incorporating the role of lakes, which are dominant landscape features. 

Back to Projects